Bulletins

RLC Virtual Summit: Highlights

posted Oct 9, 10:48 pm (12 days ago), permalink

I condensed over eight hours of video into nine minutes of highlights.

I hope you enjoy this small taste of the Rapid Learning Cycles Virtual Summit, and that it encourages you to learn more about Rapid Learning Cycles.

We'd like to have another event like this in the fall of 2018.  Follow the instructions at the end of the video to make sure that you find out about it in time to sign up.

/files/715237/RLC-Virtual-Summit-Highlights-Compressed(2).mp4

Loading the player...

RLC Virtual Summit Video #4: The Language of Rapid Learning Cycles

posted Oct 4, 11:01 am (17 days ago), permalink

This video is a bonus for the Rapid Learning Cycles Virtual Summit.  It describes the relationship between Lean and the Rapid Learning Cycles Framework.

This video series evolved from a talk I gave at the Lean Product Development Exchange in San Jose, CA in September of 2017.

Other videos in this series will describe:

  • Rapid Learning Cycles and Lean
  • Rapid Learning Cycles and Agile
  • Rapid Learning Cycles and Innovation Practices Like Design Thinking and Lean Startup

Enjoy!

/files/715237/RLC-Language.mp4

Loading the player...

RLC Virtual Summit Video #3: Rapid Learning Cycles with Design Thinking, Lean Startup and Other I...

posted Oct 4, 11:00 am (17 days ago), permalink

This video is a bonus for the Rapid Learning Cycles Virtual Summit.  It describes the relationship between Lean and the Rapid Learning Cycles Framework.

This video series evolved from a talk I gave at the Lean Product Development Exchange in San Jose, CA in September of 2017.

Other videos in this series will describe:

  • Rapid Learning Cycles and Lean
  • Rapid Learning Cycles and Agile
  • The Language of Rapid Learning Cycles

Enjoy!

/files/715237/RLC-Innovation.mp4

Loading the player...

RLC Virtual Summit Bonus Video #2: Rapid Learning Cycles and Agile

posted Oct 4, 10:32 am (17 days ago), permalink

This video is a bonus for the Rapid Learning Cycles Virtual Summit.  It describes the relationship between Lean and the Rapid Learning Cycles Framework.

This video series evolved from a talk I gave at the Lean Product Development Exchange in San Jose, CA in September of 2017.

Other videos in this series will describe:

  • Rapid Learning Cycles and Lean
  • Rapid Learning Cycles with Innovation Practices, Design Thinking and Lean Startup
  • The Language of Rapid Learning Cycles

Enjoy!

 

/files/715237/RLC-Agile.mp4

Loading the player...

RLC Virtual Summit Bonus Video #1: Rapid Learning Cycles and Lean

posted Oct 4, 10:31 am (17 days ago), permalink

This video is a bonus for the Rapid Learning Cycles Virtual Summit.  It describes the relationship between Lean and the Rapid Learning Cycles Framework.

This video series evolved from a talk I gave at the Lean Product Development Exchange in San Jose, CA in September of 2017.

Other videos in this series will describe:

  • Rapid Learning Cycles and Agile Development
  • Rapid Learning Cycles with Innovation Practices, Design Thinking and Lean Startup
  • The Language of Rapid Learning Cycles

Enjoy!

/files/715237/RLC-Lean-Trimmed.mp4

Loading the player...

Planning for Uncertainty and Discovery: The Agile Roots of RLCs

posted Aug 17, 4:43 pm (65 days ago), permalink

Types of Knowledge Gaps

When I talk to general audiences about the Rapid Learning Cycles framework, I often tell people that they can think of it as 'Agile for Hardware."   

Program managers who have been trained in Agile development can often spot things in the framework that look and feel famliar to them.

That's no accident. Scrum is the best-known of the Agile methods, with a comprehensive set of practices and well-designed training programs to teach them.  At a key point in the development of the Rapid Learning Cycles framework, a team in an Advanced R & D Lab asked me for help in adapting Scrum to fit their work.  I invited Kathy Iberle, an Agile software expert, to do the project with me. This group went on to become one of the first four to implement the Rapid Learning Cycles framework, and many of the adaptations I describe in this week's Knowledge Brief had their beginnings in that project to adapt Scrum to a team that was doing nothing like software development.

Key Takeaways

  • Agile is not sufficient for programs with high cost-of-change and complex dependency chains, yet Agile’s tools become necessary in environments with high uncertainty.
  • Rapid Learning Cycles adapts Agile’s tools to help teams make better decisions when those decisions must stick — but the work inside a Learning Cycle is much different.
  • Agile Software Development integrates well with the Rapid Learning Cycles framework because the foundations are well-aligned.

 

Planning for Uncertainty and Discovery: The Agile Roots of the Rapid Learning Cycles Framework

Agile-Roots-RLC-Letter.pdf

Agile-Roots-RLC-Tabloid.pdf

 

 Read this Knowledge Brief as a LinkedIn Article:

Planning for Uncertainty and Discovery

This Knowledge Brief may be freely distributed without modifications in its original PDF form, including all authorship, copyright and contact information. Other uses require our explicit permission.

 

Rapid Learning Cycles Throughout the Enterprise: Where Else to Use RLCs

posted Aug 2, 2:51 pm (80 days ago), permalink

Types of Knowledge Gaps

Last week, I described how we used Rapid Learning Cycles to update our web site, and why that led to some other important insights about our business.

Since then, some of you have written to me about other uses for Rapid Learning Cycles, to support strategic deployments, culture change programs and IT software platform evaluations.

So I started to wonder, "When would I want to use RLCs, and where would I not need it?"  The 2 x 2 matrix on the left was the result.

I've been writing for awhile that "just use Agile" isn't enough for hardware programs because of the high cost of change, and that traditional project management breaks down in environments of high uncertainty. The matrix pulled all of that together, clarifying when to use Rapid Learning Cycles, when to use Agile, and when to use traditional project management tools, such as complex Gantt charts.

 

This week's Knowledge Brief describes this model, and outlines some situations where Rapid Learning Cycles could be used outside of product development to get better results for a program that has high uncertainty and high cost of change.

 

Key Takeaways

      • Rapid Learning Cycles can help any program that has high uncertainty and high cost of change, because those are the conditions where the RLC framework was developed.
      • Agile Software Development breaks down in environments of high cost of change.
      • Traditional Project Management breaks down in environments of high uncertainty.
      • While uncertainty and cost of change can be decreased, they can’t be eliminated.

 

Rapid Learning Cycles Throughout the Enterprise: Rapid Learning for Any High Uncertainty / High Cost of Change Program

Where-Else-RLCs-Letter.pdf

Where-Else-RLCs-Tabloid.pdf 

 

This Knowledge Brief may be freely distributed without modifications in its original PDF form, including all authorship, copyright and contact information. Other uses require our explicit permission.

 

Better Decisions Lead To Easier Implementations: How RLCs Helped Us Get Our New Site Up in Half t...

posted Jul 25, 9:57 pm (88 days ago), permalink

Types of Knowledge Gaps

What is the best architecture for RLCI's public and community web sites? What does someone who's just purchased a book need from us to encourage them to go further?

Do the Rapid Learning Cycles workshops work TOO well?

After a disappointing website launch in 2016, we regrouped this year and turned to a proven framework for managing a program with high uncertainty: Rapid Learning Cycles.

This week's Knowledge Brief describes how we used the Rapid Learning Cycles framework inside RLCI to prepare for the release of our new web site - in half the time we'd planned.

We achieved these results despite a major business disruption, questions that turned out to be a lot bigger than we thought they were during our Kickoff Event, and expanding scope.

Don't worry—we are not going to make the workshops less effective.  But if you've been on the fence about Rapid Learning Cycles because you think your programs are too small, too fuzzy or too broad, read about how we used Rapid Learning Cycles to develop new solutions to our most important problems at RLCI.

Key Takeaways

      • No program is too small for a few Rapid Learning Cycles.
      • Better decisions lead to faster implementation because we did not get stuck in long, slow loopbacks and ran into few unanticipated problems.
      • We dropped Rapid Learning Cycles once we moved into Execution Mode, but continued to use Agile project management methods that enabled us to capitalize on opportunities to move faster.

 

Better Decisions Lead To Easier Implementations: How Rapid Learning Cycles Helped Us Get Our New Site Up in Half the Time 

How-We-Used-RLCs-Letter.pdf

How-We-Used-RLCs-Tabloid.pdf

 

This Knowledge Brief may be freely distributed without modifications in its original PDF form, including all authorship, copyright and contact information. Other uses require our explicit permission.

 

Three Types of KGs to Close: Learning Activities to Establish Facts, Develop Alternatives and Fin...

posted Jul 21, 11:48 am (92 days ago), permalink

Types of Knowledge Gaps

This Knowledge Brief describes the three types of Knowledge Gaps that we see within programs: Knowledge Gaps that ask questions to establish the facts, Knowledge Gaps that ask questions to develop alternatives and Knowledge Gaps that ask questions to find the boundaries or limits of the system. 

These three types of Knowledge Gaps require different learning activities because they have different objectives.

This week's Knowledge Brief describes the learning activities that are appropriate to each type, and how to find the reusable and extensible knowledge so that all of them capture knowledge that leads to better decisions now and faster development for future teams.

 

 

 

Key Takeaways

  • Some Knowledge Gaps ask questions to establish facts; others explore alternatives or seek limits and boundaries that constrain the solution.
  • Each type of Knowledge Gap needs different learning activities to close them and different approaches to make the knowledge more reusable and extensible.
  • For all types, it’s important to capture the things that fail, as well as the things that work, because the failures help everyone build deeper understanding of the product design.

 

Three Types of Knowledge Gaps to Close: Learning Activities to Establish Facts, Develop Alternatives and Find Limits

Types-of-KGs-Letter.pdf

Types-of-KGs-Tabloid.pdf

 

This Knowledge Brief may be freely distributed without modifications in its original PDF form, including all authorship, copyright and contact information. Other uses require our explicit permission.

 

“The Best Obtainable Version of the Truth”: How to Close a KG That Has a Fuzzy Answer

posted Jul 21, 11:41 am (92 days ago), permalink

Closed Knowledge Gaps

All Knowledge Gaps have factual answers, but not all Knowledge Gaps can be easily closed with the same degree of certainty. What can we do when a Knowledge Gap has a fuzzy answer that is open to interpretation?

"The best obtainable version of the truth" is one principle to guide us in these situations. This principle helps to clarify the value of partial information and constraints, realistic standards and our evolving understanding as we strive to close these challenging Knowledge Gaps.

This week's Knowledge Brief describes how "the best obtainable version of the truth" can help us avoid analysis paralysis to know when we've closed a Knowledge Gap sufficiently to support a Key Decision.

 

 

Key Takeaways

  • While all Knowledge Gaps have factual answers, not all Knowledge Gaps can be closed with a clear, certain answer.
  • “The best obtainable version of the truth” is a principle that recognizes the value of partial information, constraints, standards and our evolving understanding.
  • A Knowledge Gap is closed when the knowledge is sufficient to support a Key Decision.

 

“The Best Obtainable Version of the Truth”: How to Close a Knowledge Gap That Has a Fuzzy Answer

Closed-Knowledge-Gaps-Letter.pdf

Closed-Knowledge-Gaps-Tabloid.pdf

 

This Knowledge Brief may be freely distributed without modifications in its original PDF form, including all authorship, copyright and contact information. Other uses require our explicit permission.

 

[1] 2 3